Tag Archives: chain

Scharetta Bow Scarf Pattern

25 Mar
bowscarf3

The Birthday Girl, showing it off.

It’s a special crochet month with means you deserve a Stacy C original design! (Waiting for applause)
It’s been a few months since my last design and everyone seems to be getting a kick out of my “Faux Entrelac” pattern on Ravelry. And I’m trying to build my street cred… I mean, give you more creative ideas! I’ve noticed that my designs like to use a lot of chaining, but I’m ok with that. I’m taking a simple element and making it a fashion MUST. Have fun with my design and let me know either here or on its Ravelry Page, what you’ve made and what you think.

Hook: I (5.5 mm)
Yarn: Red Heart, Soft in Berry (Weight #4)
Amount used: 66 grams total for the scarf. 14 grams for the bow

Scarf base:
Ch 14, turn
Ch 1, sc 14. Cut

Close up.

Close up.

Scarf:
In the last sc, ch 250. Cut yarn leaving about a 2-yard tail

For the chains 2-14 continue in the following way:
In the next sc (to the right of the last one made) chain 20
Sl st into the left chain on its 20th stitch. You want to make sure when you slip the stitch that the chains line up. You only slip into the chain next to it, not all the chains.
*Ch 20 stitches, sl st into the left chain on its 20th stitch*. Repeat * section 9 times
On the last section ch 25, sl st into the left chain on its 25th stitch
Cut yarn after each chain is finished. Leave about a 4″ tail.

Scarf finishing base:
(Start working on the WS with all tail ends in front of you)
With the 2-yard tail from first chain, Hdc 14 into each chain end, turn
Ch 1, sc 14. Cut yarn

Scarf Finishing:
With the tail ends, you can either try to tuck all them into the short base. I decided to only tuck the tails that started and ended the base structure. I then took two tail ends next to each other, double knotted them, then snipped the ends. I did this for both bases.

Bow:
Ch 18, turn
*Ch1, sc 18, turn*, repeat * 4 times. Cut yarn
Bow will be about 3″ x 2″. Tuck in ends

Not too shabby.

Not too shabby.

Bow band:
Ch 8, turn
Ch1, Hdc 8, turn
Ch 1, sc 8. Cut yarn leaving an 8″ tail to sew bow onto scarf.

Blocking:
Because it’s Red Heart yarn, and pretty hearty (pun intended), I steam ironed the scarf separately from the bow. I also steam ironed the bow seperately from the scarf. While ironing the scarf I focused on one section at a time (between the slipped stitches is a “section”) making sure the chains faced right side before placing heat on them. I did iron the bow before and after I added the band. I only added heat for about 10-15 sections each time. I did do one last “once over” after I sewed the bow onto the scarf.

Bow sewing:
With your rectangle, squish the middle and wrap the band around it. Take care to center the band around the rectangle and sew a couple of stitches to secure the band. Now you can sew the bow onto the scarf.
I tried to sew the bow onto the chain section, but found that too difficult. Instead, I sewed the bow onto a sl stitch section, making it easier to anchor it, before tacking it down onto the scarf.

Voilá! You now have a snazzy scarf for the spring – and around here it just won’t quit snowing!

Continuing my FO fire!
-Stacy C.

Chain, Chain, Chaaaain. Crochet Chains Made to Wear

3 Mar

March is National Crochet Month, so here at theyarnfix, we’re kicking things off right with this fundamentals piece. What better way to start of a big month of fiber crafting then at the basics? Chaining is the starting point for Crochet and then you move to SCs, HDCs, DC, and TCs (click here for your crochet stitch helper guide), which can get very confusing and hard really fast. While re-learning crochet, I went back to fundamentals and started looking at pictures with simple chaining as the basis for patterns. You can actually make a lot of chic jewelry simply by using chaining. Below are some pictures of my chain necklaces (Shameless plug, also available for purchase in my Etsy store!):

This is really something any seasoned or un-seasoned crocheter can do and actually use. If you want to try making your own fiber accessories, here are some tips:

1) Have fun. Let your imagination run wild. It might “just” be changing, but as you can see, I tried my hand at multiple looks with this simple technique.

2) You can chain multiple necklaces separately and sew the ends together; or you can SC or sl st a couple of stitches at each end to keep them whole. But you can always just wear multiple chain necklaces at once and have fun color pairing.

3) If you want a smaller, tighter necklace use 100 stitches as your base number. If you want one that falls a little lower on your breast bone use 120 stitches, and for one even lower use 140-160. To make a multiples necklace with two or more chains, increase the next necklace by five to seven stitches. This means 120 for the first one, 125 for the second, etc., that way you get a little bit of gap between them.

4) Add embellishments. Whether it’s a flower, buttons or an anchor strap, test out some looks to make your neck piece a little more snazzy.

It only takes me about one to three hours to make a necklace, depending on my design. A three-tiered number, sans embellishment takes me about an hour. Accents take a little more time, maybe 20 minutes to an hour. So, if you’ve made all the hats and scarves you could give a person, try thinking of creating one of these beauties that can be worn in any season. Now’s the time to refine technique, make it unique and create your own patterns. So, the next time you make a crack at how you can “only” make really long chains there’s actually something cute you can do with them!

If you have any questions about how I made specific necklaces shown above leave a comment and I will be glad to impart some of my design secrets.

Back to my creativity zone,
-Stacy C.

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