Tag Archives: crochet patterns

Faux Crochet Entrelac (Like Faux Fur, but BETTER!)

29 Nov

Hello readers,

Beautiful Cowl-ness

I recently had to insert a project into my Christmas knitting extravaganza to make a birthday present. I needed something quick and cute and decided to make a cute cowl. I used used one of the cable patterns from the Sólás Caomh by Jodi Euchner and modified it to be cowl-friendly. I used some Lion Brand Yarn in Homespun Ambrosia to help me stash bust – it was the perfect hue for the birthday girl.

Faux Cable Cowl Pattern
Be sure to make your tension loose and be generous with the yarn being used in each stitch. If you pull tight and uniform, you will have a lot of gaps between the cables and it won’t feel so warm.

Using Bulky Yarn (weight 5) and a J hook (6 mm)
Glossary: BPdc – Back post double crochet; ch- Chain; dc – double crochet; FPdc/tr – Front post double crochet/triple crochet;
hdc – half double crochet; sk – skipped; sts – stitches
(Trebles used in this pattern are American terminology so you would wrap the yarn twice around the hook before making a stitch)

Loosely Ch22

Row 1 (WS): DC all stitches

Row 2 (cable row): Ch3 (count as first stitch here and throughout the pattern), DC 1 in the next stitch
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in the next 3 sts
Working in front of sts just made FPtr in 3 sk sts*
Repeat from * 3xs
Dc 2

Row 3: Ch 2, hdc 1 stitch
BPdc in 18 sts
Hdc 2

Row 4 (cable row): Ch 3, dc 1 stitch

A stylish Nanook

FPdc in next 3 sts
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in next 3 sts
Working behind sts just made FPtr in 3 skipped sts*
Repeat from * 2xs
FPdc in next 3 sts
Dc 2

Row 5: Repeat row 3

Row 6 (cable row): Ch 3, dc 1 stitch
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in next 3 sts
Working in front of sts just made FPtr in 3 sk sts*
Repeat * 3xs
Dc 2

Row 7: Ch 2, dc 1
BPdc 18 sts
Hdc 2

Row 8 (cable row): Ch 3, dc 1

The Birthday Girl strutting her handmade chic

FPdc in next 3 sts
*Sk next 3 sts
FPtr in next 3 sts
Working behind sts just made FPtr in 3 sk sts*
Repeat * 2xs
FPdc in next 3 sts
Dc 2

Row 9: Repeat row 7

Repeat rows 2-9 however many times you want. I did mine 12 times.
Finish – slip st ends together inside out to make a seam. Light blocking needed for this yarn.

A couple of other fun ideas you can do is end with multiple dc rows to sew buttons on and make it a cowl. I didn’t put a border on it because the scarf is just supposed to look like the interwoven cables. For those of you who HAVE to have some kind of gauge, a row should be about 1.5-2″ long for the right side and about 1-1.5″ long on a wrong side.

If you use this pattern, PLEASE, let me know what you think on my Ravelry pattern page. I really want to know how you peeps are rocking this design.

Workin’ my Crochet Creativity,
-Stacy C.

Chain, Chain, Chaaaain. Crochet Chains Made to Wear

3 Mar

March is National Crochet Month, so here at theyarnfix, we’re kicking things off right with this fundamentals piece. What better way to start of a big month of fiber crafting then at the basics? Chaining is the starting point for Crochet and then you move to SCs, HDCs, DC, and TCs (click here for your crochet stitch helper guide), which can get very confusing and hard really fast. While re-learning crochet, I went back to fundamentals and started looking at pictures with simple chaining as the basis for patterns. You can actually make a lot of chic jewelry simply by using chaining. Below are some pictures of my chain necklaces (Shameless plug, also available for purchase in my Etsy store!):

This is really something any seasoned or un-seasoned crocheter can do and actually use. If you want to try making your own fiber accessories, here are some tips:

1) Have fun. Let your imagination run wild. It might “just” be changing, but as you can see, I tried my hand at multiple looks with this simple technique.

2) You can chain multiple necklaces separately and sew the ends together; or you can SC or sl st a couple of stitches at each end to keep them whole. But you can always just wear multiple chain necklaces at once and have fun color pairing.

3) If you want a smaller, tighter necklace use 100 stitches as your base number. If you want one that falls a little lower on your breast bone use 120 stitches, and for one even lower use 140-160. To make a multiples necklace with two or more chains, increase the next necklace by five to seven stitches. This means 120 for the first one, 125 for the second, etc., that way you get a little bit of gap between them.

4) Add embellishments. Whether it’s a flower, buttons or an anchor strap, test out some looks to make your neck piece a little more snazzy.

It only takes me about one to three hours to make a necklace, depending on my design. A three-tiered number, sans embellishment takes me about an hour. Accents take a little more time, maybe 20 minutes to an hour. So, if you’ve made all the hats and scarves you could give a person, try thinking of creating one of these beauties that can be worn in any season. Now’s the time to refine technique, make it unique and create your own patterns. So, the next time you make a crack at how you can “only” make really long chains there’s actually something cute you can do with them!

If you have any questions about how I made specific necklaces shown above leave a comment and I will be glad to impart some of my design secrets.

Back to my creativity zone,
-Stacy C.

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